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Critical Theories in Education

This book examines critical theories in education research from various points of view in order to critique the relations of power and knowledge in education and schooling practices. It addresses social injustices in the field of education, while at the same time questioning traditional standards of critical theory. Drawing on recent social and literary criticism, this collection identifies conversations across disciplines that address the theoretical and methodological challenges in educational debate. “Critical Theories in Education” offers a rethinking of Marxist theories of education, joining issues of teaching and pedagogy with issues of the state and economy, social movements, literary criticism, pragmatism and postcolonialism.

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Social Reconstruction Learning

This volume argues that educational problems have their basis in an ideology of binary opposites often referred to as dualism, which is deeply embedded in all aspects of Western society and philosophy, and that it is partly because mainstream schooling incorporates dualism that it is unable to facilitate the thinking skills, dispositions and understandings necessary for autonomy, democratic citizenship and leading a meaningful life. Drawing on the philosophy of John Dewey, feminist pragmatism, Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy for Children program, and the service learning movement, Bleazby proposes an approach to schooling termed “social reconstruction learning,” in which students engage in philosophical inquiries with members of their community in order to reconstruct real social problems, arguing that this pedagogy can better facilitate independent thinking, imaginativeness, emotional intelligence, autonomy, and active citizenship.

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Waging Peace in Our Schools

The most prominent activists working in the fields of conflict resolution and emotional literacy argue that schools–as our children’s last common public institution in a fractured time–must educate the heart as well as the mind. Linda Lantieri and Janet Patti show us how it can be done. They draw on the latest research in social and emotional learning, as well as on their years of experience with thousands of kids and teachers through the Resolving Conflict Creatively Program–one of the largest and most successful of its kind in the country, serving over 150,000 children in more than 325 schools nationwide. Waging Peace in Our Schools is news from the front–the essential primer on a movement that is transforming our schools.

The book is a practical guide, filled with stories, voices, ideas, and advice. We see teachers using innovative techniques to create “peaceable classrooms,” student mediators who are changing the lives of their schools, and the core curricula of conflict resolution and diversity education.

“Waging Peace in Our Schools is a model of emotional intelligence. . . . I hope that every teacher and parent reads this, and takes this superb advice to heart.”

–Daniel Goleman

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The Pendulum

The pendulum is a universal topic in primary and secondary schools, but its full potential for learning about physics, the nature of science, and the relationships between science, mathematics, technology, society and culture is seldom realised.

Contributions to this 32-chapter anthology deal with the science, history, methodology and pedagogy of pendulum motion. There is ample material for the richer and more cross-disciplinary treatment of the pendulum from elementary school to high school, and through to advanced university classes.

Scientists will value the studies on the physics of the pendulum; historians will appreciate the detailed treatment of Galileo, Huygens, Newton and Foucault’s pendulum investigations; psychologists and educators will learn from the papers on Piaget; teachers will welcome the many contributions to pendulum pedagogy.

All readers will come away with a new awareness of the importance of the pendulum in the foundation and development of modern science; and for its centrality in so many facets of society and culture.

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Teaching with Poverty in Mind

In Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids’ Brains and What Schools Can Do About It, veteran educator and brain expert Eric Jensen takes an unflinching look at how poverty hurts children, families, and communities across the United States and demonstrates how schools can improve the academic achievement and life readiness of economically disadvantaged students.

Jensen argues that although chronic exposure to poverty can result in detrimental changes to the brain, the brain’s very ability to adapt from experience means that poor children can also experience emotional, social, and academic success. A brain that is susceptible to adverse environmental effects is equally susceptible to the positive effects of rich, balanced learning environments and caring relationships that build students’ resilience, self-esteem, and character.

Drawing from research, experience, and real school success stories, Teaching with Poverty in Mind reveals

* What poverty is and how it affects students in school;

* What drives change both at the macro level (within schools and districts) and at the micro level (inside a student’s brain);

* Effective strategies from those who have succeeded and ways to replicate those best practices at your own school; and

* How to engage the resources necessary to make change happen.

Too often, we talk about change while maintaining a culture of excuses. We can do better. Although no magic bullet can offset the grave challenges faced daily by disadvantaged children, this timely resource shines a spotlight on what matters most, providing an inspiring and practical guide for enriching the minds and lives of all your students.

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The Micro-Politics of the School

Stephen Ball’s micro-political theory of school organization is a radical departure from traditional theories. He rejects a prescriptive ‘top down’ approach and directly addresses the interest and concerns of teachers and current problems facing schools. In doing so he raises question about the adequacy and appropriateness of the existing forms of organizational control in schools. Through case studies and interviews with teachers, the book captures the flavour of real conflicts in schools – particularly in times of falling rolls, change of leadership or amalgamations – when teachers’ autonomy seems to be at stake.

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International Handbook of Jewish Education

The International Handbook of Jewish Education, a two volume publication, brings together scholars and practitioners engaged in the field of Jewish Education and its cognate fields world-wide. Their submissions make a significant contribution to our knowledge of the field of Jewish Education as we start the second decade of the 21st century.

The Handbook is divided broadly into four main sections:

  1. Vision and Practice: focusing on issues of philosophy, identity and planning –the big issues of Jewish Education.
  2. Teaching and Learning: focusing on areas of curriculum and engagement
  3. Applications, focusing on the ways that Jewish Education is transmitted in particular contexts, both formal and informal, for children and adults.
  4. Geographical, focusing on historical, demographic, social and other issues that are specific to a region or where an issue or range of issues can be compared and contrasted between two or more locations.

This comprehensive collection of articles providing high quality content, constitutes a difinitive statement on the state of Jewish Education world wide, as well as through a wide variety of lenses and contexts. It is written in a style that is accessible to a global community of academics and professionals.

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Values Education and Quality Teaching

Some revision of public schooling history is necessary to challenge the dominant mythology that public schools were established on the grounds of values-neutrality. In fact, those responsible for the foundations of public education in Australia were sufficiently pragmatic to know that its success relied on its charter being in accord with public sentiment. Part of the pragmatism was in convincing those whose main experience of education had been through some form of church-based education that state-based education was capable of meeting the same ends. Hence, the documents of the 1870s and 1880s that contained the charters of the various state and territory systems witness to a breadth of vision about the scope of education. Beyond the standard goals of literacy and numeracy, education was said to be capable of assuring personal morality for each individual and a suitable citizenry for the soon-to-be new nation. As an instance, the NSW Public Instr- tion Act of 1880 (cf. NSW, 1912), under the rubric of “religious teaching”, stressed the need for students to be inculcated into the values of their society, including understanding the role that religious values had played in forming that society’s legal codes and social ethics. The notion, therefore, that public education is part of a deep and ancient heritage around values neutrality is mistaken and in need of se- ous revision. The evidence suggests that public education’s initial conception was of being the complete educator, not only of young people’s minds but of their inner character as well.

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Antiracist Education

This book combines theory, practice, and ethnography in an exploration of how teachers can fully implement diversity and antiracism as a foundation of their teaching approach. The author, a white mother of children of color, whose work is influenced by her own experience being raised in an antiracist, activist family, developed her curriculum over many years of active involvement with parents and teachers in schools. She presents her curriculum along with ethnographic reports of the processes of change that teachers experience as they fully explore the realities of race relations, its history, and the lived experiences of others. Kailin shows how immersion in this exploration enables teachers to develop curricula and teaching practices that are effectively antiracist and fully connected to students’ lives.

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Out of Our Minds

“It is often said that education and training are the keys to the future. They are, but a key can be turned in two directions. Turn it one way andyou lock resources away, even from those they belong to. Turn it the otherway and you release resources and give people back to themselves. To realizeour true creative potential—in our organizations, in our schools and in our communities—we need to think differently about ourselves and to actdifferently towards each other. We must learn to be creative.”
Ken Robinson

PRAISE FOR OUT OF OUR MINDS

“Ken Robinson writes brilliantly about the different ways in which creativity is undervalued and ignored . . . especially in our educational systems.”
John Cleese

“Out of Our Minds explains why being creative in today’sworld is a vital necessity. This book is not to be missed.”
Ken Blanchard, co-author of The One-minute Manager and The Secret

“If ever there was a time when creativity was necessary for the survival andgrowth of any organization, it is now. This book, more than any other I know, providesimportant insights on how leaders can evoke and sustain those creative juices.”
Warren Bennis, Distinguished Professor of Business, University of Southern California; Thomas S. Murphy Distinguished Rresearch Fellow, Harvard Business School; Best-selling Author, Geeks and Geezers

“All corporate leaders should read this book.”
Richard Scase, Author and Business Forecaster

“This really is a remarkable book. It does for human resources what Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring did for the environment.”
Wally Olins, Founder, Wolff-olins

“Books about creativity are not always creative. Ken Robinson’s is a welcome exception”
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, c.s. and d.j. Davidson Professor of Psychology, Claremont Graduate University; Director, Quality of Life Research Center; Best-selling Author, Flow

“The best analysis I’ve seen of the disjunction between the kinds of intelligence that we have traditionally honored in schools and the kinds ofcreativity that we need today in our organizations and our society.”
Howard Gardner, a. hobbs professor in cognition and education, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Best-selling Author, Frames of Mind