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International Research Handbook on Values Education and Student Wellbeing

Informed by the most up-to-date research from around the world, as well as examples of good practice, this handbook analyzes values education in the context of a range of school-based measures associated with student wellbeing. These include social, emotional, moral and spiritual growth – elements that seem to be present where intellectual advancement and academic achievement are being maximized. This text comes as ‘values education’ widens in scope from being concerned with morality, ethics, civics and citizenship to a broader definition synonymous with a holistic approach to education in general. This expanded purview is frequently described as pedagogy relating to ‘values’ and ‘wellbeing’.

This contemporary understanding of values education, or values and wellbeing pedagogy, fits well with recent neuroscience research. This has shown that notions of cognition, or intellect, are far more intertwined with social and emotional growth than earlier educational paradigms have allowed for. In other words, the best laid plans about the technical aspects of pedagogy are bound to fail unless the growth of the whole person – social, emotional, moral, spiritual and intellectual, is the pedagogical target. Teachers and educationalists will find that this handbook provides evidence, culled from both research and practice, of the beneficial effects of such a ‘values and wellbeing’ pedagogy.

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Pedagogies of the Imagination

I have long admired the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies. That admiration followed from my experience as a high-school teacher of English in a wealthy suburb of New York City at the end of the 1960s. A “dream” job—I taught four classes of 15–20 students during a nine-period day—in a “dream” suburb (where I could afford to reside only by taking a room in a retired teacher’s house), many of these often Ivy-League-bound students had everything but meaningful lives. This middle-class, Midwestern young teacher was flabbergasted. In one sense, my academic life has been devoted to understanding that searing experience. Matters of meaning seemed paramount in the curriculum field to which Paul Klohr introduced me at Ohio State. Klohr assigned me the work of curriculum theorists such as James B. Macdonald. Like Timothy Leonard (who also studied with Klohr at Ohio State) and Peter Willis, Macdonald (1995) understood that school reform was part of a broader cultural and political crisis in which meaning is but one casualty. In the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies, scholars labor to understand this crisis and the conditions for the reconstruction of me- ing in our time, in our schools.

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Values Education and Quality Teaching

Some revision of public schooling history is necessary to challenge the dominant mythology that public schools were established on the grounds of values-neutrality. In fact, those responsible for the foundations of public education in Australia were sufficiently pragmatic to know that its success relied on its charter being in accord with public sentiment. Part of the pragmatism was in convincing those whose main experience of education had been through some form of church-based education that state-based education was capable of meeting the same ends. Hence, the documents of the 1870s and 1880s that contained the charters of the various state and territory systems witness to a breadth of vision about the scope of education. Beyond the standard goals of literacy and numeracy, education was said to be capable of assuring personal morality for each individual and a suitable citizenry for the soon-to-be new nation. As an instance, the NSW Public Instr- tion Act of 1880 (cf. NSW, 1912), under the rubric of “religious teaching”, stressed the need for students to be inculcated into the values of their society, including understanding the role that religious values had played in forming that society’s legal codes and social ethics. The notion, therefore, that public education is part of a deep and ancient heritage around values neutrality is mistaken and in need of se- ous revision. The evidence suggests that public education’s initial conception was of being the complete educator, not only of young people’s minds but of their inner character as well.

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International Handbook of the Religious, Moral and Spiritual Dimensions in Education

In today’s complex and plural world, there has been, particularly in western cultures, an identifiable change in peoples’ relationships with religious traditions. Some of these changes have also permeated non-western cultural traditions as they have been exposed to and influenced by television and other media that is dominated by western life styles and contexts. A corresponding movement is a vital resurgence of interest in human spirituality. Traditionally, spirituality has resided and been contained within religious frameworks but while the links between the two areas are still acknowledged by many in the contemporary world, spirituality is perceived by some as an aspect of human life that is distinct from religion. Consequently, many are searching for meaning within and without religious traditions today and seeking answers to ethical and moral questions that have been generated by the knowledge and technological explosion. One outcome is the renewed interest in the religious, spiritual and moral dimensions of education throughout the life cycle.

This International Handbook presents the research and professional practice of scholars who are daily engaged in the consideration of these dimensions in education. The result is a collection of essays which reflects the discipline, in all of its internationality, as it as today. Embedded within the chapters is also an agenda for the future, where the religious, moral and spiritual dimensions in education are proposed as an exciting and challenging way forward for educators at all levels in society. As well, it offers a vision for the emergence of a peaceful and just world.

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Teaching Adolescents

Grounded in the semiotic thought of Charles Sanders Peirce, America’s greatest polymath, Howard A. Smith’s Teaching Adolescents addresses topics in educational psychology from a semiotic or sign-based perspective rather than a behavioural one. In this educational psychology textbook, Smith’s main argument is that teachers must rely on signs of all kinds to understand students and to survive as teachers. This book is unique in applying a single unifying framework throughout.

Among the many concepts that Smith discusses in Teaching Adolescents are the nature of the sign and its basis in semiotics, and the use of signs in classroom management. Various signs of learning and thinking are highlighted, as are those signs derived from local culture that have an impact on the lives of students and teachers, such as adolescent preoccupations with drugs and sex. In addition, Smith discusses what teachers can do to ensure their physical and emotional health in the classroom. The theoretical continuity and practical application of semiotics makes Teaching Adolescents both an indispensable resource for students in pre-service teaching programs and teachers working with teens, and a fascinating and real world study for anyone interested in the science of signs.

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Critical Thinking and Learning

The editors of this book employ social, cognitive, linguistic, and political theoretical innovations to develop a new conception of critical thinking. They examine how such a construct might be taught in a variety of social settings and disciplines. Using a host of previously neglected perspectives—sociocognition, issues of political economy, complexity theory, and critical theoretical notions of epistemology and power theory—the editors and authors present a conceptually sophisticated yet accessible compendium on critical thinking.

The introduction guides readers through the reconceptualization process. Specific entries focus on particular dimensions of the challenges to old-style critical thinking. In this context, readers can choose entries that discuss various means of engaging students in the critical complex perspective of critical thinking. The encyclopedia is aware of both theoretical concerns and the everyday realities of schooling in the 21st century. As such, it rounded in a respectful view of teachers that assumes they are capable of levels of expertise unacknowledged by many contemporary articulations of school reform. The educational, cognitive, and professional vision developed in the encyclopedia offers a profound alternative to the top-down impositional models now sweeping the nation’s school districts.

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Educational Psychology with Virtual Psychology Labs

This comprehensive educational psychology book blends a strong scholarly and theoretical background with the application of theories and concepts using real-world examples, case studies, and practical teaching strategies. The text’s innovative pedagogical program is anchored by a cohesive learning objective system integrated throughout each chapter, guiding your reading and reinforcing your understanding of concepts. This edition includes access to the book’s website, Education CourseMate, where you can participate in Virtual Psychology Labs. Introduced in the text, the labs illuminate key experiments that are not easily explained in a book or demonstrated in the classroom. These first-hand research experiences allow you to gain a better understanding of the experiments’ methodologies, conclusions, and implications. TeachSource Video Cases, introduced in the text and available at CourseMate, allow you to view real-life classroom scenarios that demonstrate teaching applications and best practices. Among other distinctive aspects of the text are an entire chapter on group process and a unique Think It Over feature that asks you to reflect on important topics as both a student of psychology and a future classroom teacher.
Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

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Beyond Cartesian Dualism

There is surprisingly little known about affect in science education. Despite periodic forays into monitoring students’ attitudes-toward-science, the effect of affect is too often overlooked. Beyond Cartesian Dualism gathers together contemporary theorizing in this axiomatic area. In fourteen chapters, senior scholars of international standing use their knowledge of the literature and empirical data to model the relationship between cognition and affect in science education. Their revealing discussions are grounded in a broad range of educational contexts including school classrooms, universities, science centres, travelling exhibits and refugee camps, and explore an array of far reaching questions. What is known about science teachers’ and students’ emotions? How do emotions mediate and moderate instruction? How might science education promote psychological resilience? How might educators engage affect as a way of challenging existing inequalities and practices?

This book will be an invaluable resource for anybody interested in science education research and more generally in research on teaching, learning and affect. It offers educators and researchers a challenge, to recognize the mutually constitutive nature of cognition and affect.

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Bullying

In recent years there have been an increasing number of incidents where children have either perpetrated or been the victims of violence in the schools. Often times the children who perpetrated the violence had been the victims of school bullying. If bullying once was a matter of extorting lunch money from one’s peers, it has since escalated into slander, sexual harassment, and violence. And the victims, unable to find relief, become depressed and/or violent in return.

Despite all the media attention on recent school tragedies, many of which can be traced to bullied children, there has been little in the way of research-based books toward understanding why and how bullying occurs, the effects on all the individuals involved and the most effective intervention techniques. Summarizing research in education, social, developmental, and counseling psychology, Bullying: Implications for the Classroom examines the personality and background of both those who become bullies and those most likely to become their victims, how families, peers, and schools influence bullying behavior, and the most effective interventions in pre-school, primary and middle schools. Intended for researchers, educators, and professionals in related fields, this book provides an international review of research on bullying.

KEY FEATURES:
* Presents practical ideas regarding prevention/intervention of bullying
* Covers theoretical views of bullying
* Provides an international perspective on bullying
* Discusses bullying similarities and differences in elementary and middle school

* Presents practical ideas regarding prevention/intervention of bullying
* Provides an international perspective on bullying
* Outlines information regarding bullying during the elementary and middle school years
* Covers theoretical views of bullying
* Presents new approaches to explaining bullying
* Contributing authors include internationally known researchers in the field

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Encyclopedia of Educational Psychology

The field of educational psychology draws from a variety of diverse disciplines including human development across the life span, measurement and statistics, learning and motivation, and teaching. And within these different disciplines, many other fields are featured including psychology, anthropology, education, sociology, public health, school psychology, counseling, history, and philosophy. In fact, when taught at the college or university level, educational psychology is an ambitious course that undertakes the presentation of many different topics all tied together by the theme of how the individual can best function in an “educational” setting, loosely defined as anything from pre-school through adult education. Educational psychology can be defined as the application of what we know about learning and motivation, development, and measurement and statistics to educational settings (both school- and community-based).