57857931cbcf7_gbooks

International Research Handbook on Values Education and Student Wellbeing

Informed by the most up-to-date research from around the world, as well as examples of good practice, this handbook analyzes values education in the context of a range of school-based measures associated with student wellbeing. These include social, emotional, moral and spiritual growth – elements that seem to be present where intellectual advancement and academic achievement are being maximized. This text comes as ‘values education’ widens in scope from being concerned with morality, ethics, civics and citizenship to a broader definition synonymous with a holistic approach to education in general. This expanded purview is frequently described as pedagogy relating to ‘values’ and ‘wellbeing’.

This contemporary understanding of values education, or values and wellbeing pedagogy, fits well with recent neuroscience research. This has shown that notions of cognition, or intellect, are far more intertwined with social and emotional growth than earlier educational paradigms have allowed for. In other words, the best laid plans about the technical aspects of pedagogy are bound to fail unless the growth of the whole person – social, emotional, moral, spiritual and intellectual, is the pedagogical target. Teachers and educationalists will find that this handbook provides evidence, culled from both research and practice, of the beneficial effects of such a ‘values and wellbeing’ pedagogy.

5785792e4517a_gbooks

Pedagogies of the Imagination

I have long admired the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies. That admiration followed from my experience as a high-school teacher of English in a wealthy suburb of New York City at the end of the 1960s. A “dream” job—I taught four classes of 15–20 students during a nine-period day—in a “dream” suburb (where I could afford to reside only by taking a room in a retired teacher’s house), many of these often Ivy-League-bound students had everything but meaningful lives. This middle-class, Midwestern young teacher was flabbergasted. In one sense, my academic life has been devoted to understanding that searing experience. Matters of meaning seemed paramount in the curriculum field to which Paul Klohr introduced me at Ohio State. Klohr assigned me the work of curriculum theorists such as James B. Macdonald. Like Timothy Leonard (who also studied with Klohr at Ohio State) and Peter Willis, Macdonald (1995) understood that school reform was part of a broader cultural and political crisis in which meaning is but one casualty. In the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies, scholars labor to understand this crisis and the conditions for the reconstruction of me- ing in our time, in our schools.

578577fe184ae_gbooks

The Pendulum

The pendulum is a universal topic in primary and secondary schools, but its full potential for learning about physics, the nature of science, and the relationships between science, mathematics, technology, society and culture is seldom realised.

Contributions to this 32-chapter anthology deal with the science, history, methodology and pedagogy of pendulum motion. There is ample material for the richer and more cross-disciplinary treatment of the pendulum from elementary school to high school, and through to advanced university classes.

Scientists will value the studies on the physics of the pendulum; historians will appreciate the detailed treatment of Galileo, Huygens, Newton and Foucault’s pendulum investigations; psychologists and educators will learn from the papers on Piaget; teachers will welcome the many contributions to pendulum pedagogy.

All readers will come away with a new awareness of the importance of the pendulum in the foundation and development of modern science; and for its centrality in so many facets of society and culture.

578577fb51cc1_gbooks

Values Education and Quality Teaching

Some revision of public schooling history is necessary to challenge the dominant mythology that public schools were established on the grounds of values-neutrality. In fact, those responsible for the foundations of public education in Australia were sufficiently pragmatic to know that its success relied on its charter being in accord with public sentiment. Part of the pragmatism was in convincing those whose main experience of education had been through some form of church-based education that state-based education was capable of meeting the same ends. Hence, the documents of the 1870s and 1880s that contained the charters of the various state and territory systems witness to a breadth of vision about the scope of education. Beyond the standard goals of literacy and numeracy, education was said to be capable of assuring personal morality for each individual and a suitable citizenry for the soon-to-be new nation. As an instance, the NSW Public Instr- tion Act of 1880 (cf. NSW, 1912), under the rubric of “religious teaching”, stressed the need for students to be inculcated into the values of their society, including understanding the role that religious values had played in forming that society’s legal codes and social ethics. The notion, therefore, that public education is part of a deep and ancient heritage around values neutrality is mistaken and in need of se- ous revision. The evidence suggests that public education’s initial conception was of being the complete educator, not only of young people’s minds but of their inner character as well.

5785778e12274_gbooks

Beyond Cartesian Dualism

There is surprisingly little known about affect in science education. Despite periodic forays into monitoring students’ attitudes-toward-science, the effect of affect is too often overlooked. Beyond Cartesian Dualism gathers together contemporary theorizing in this axiomatic area. In fourteen chapters, senior scholars of international standing use their knowledge of the literature and empirical data to model the relationship between cognition and affect in science education. Their revealing discussions are grounded in a broad range of educational contexts including school classrooms, universities, science centres, travelling exhibits and refugee camps, and explore an array of far reaching questions. What is known about science teachers’ and students’ emotions? How do emotions mediate and moderate instruction? How might science education promote psychological resilience? How might educators engage affect as a way of challenging existing inequalities and practices?

This book will be an invaluable resource for anybody interested in science education research and more generally in research on teaching, learning and affect. It offers educators and researchers a challenge, to recognize the mutually constitutive nature of cognition and affect.

578577851ad63_gbooks

Workplace Learning in Teacher Education

This book explores teacher workplace learning from four different perspectives: social policy, international comparators, multi-professional stances/perspectives and socio-cultural theory. First, it considers the policy and practice context of professional learning in teacher education in England, and the rest of the UK, with particular reference to professional masters level provision. The importance of teachers’ and schools’ perceptions of improvement, development and learning, and the inherent tensions between individual, school and government priorities is explored. Second, the book considers models of teacher workplace learning to be found in international research and practice to explore what perspective they can bring to understanding policy and practice relating to workplace learning in the UK. Third, it draws on cross-professional analysis to get an intellectual and theoretical purchase on workplace learning by examining how insights from across the professions can provide us with useful perspectives on policy and practice. The analysis draws particularly on insights from medicine and educational psychology. Fourth, the book cross-fertilises research and practice across the field of education by drawing on insights from perspectives such as socio-cultural and activity theory and situated learning/cognition to discover what they can offer in analysing the theoretical and pedagogic underpinnings of teacher workplace learning. In short, the book offers a number of contexts for exploring how best to conceptualise and theorise learning in the workplace in order to generate evidence to inform policy and practice and facilitates the development of a more theoretically informed and robust model of workplace learning and teaching.

5785769b3f9ba_gbooks

Teaching Primary Physical Education

‘Trainee teachers will welcome the concise and reader-friendly format this book offers. Julia Lawrence has taken great care to provide a balanced and relevant overview of the major topics trainee teachers often lack confidence in, when planning and delivering lessons. A particularly useful and welcome feature for trainee teachers is the book’s companion website with helpful links to teaching resources. This book provides essential reading for all trainee primary teachers.’

Nigel Clarke, Senior Lecturer in Physical Education, University of Cumbria.

Physical Education is an important part of the primary curriculum and one that provides unique challenges for those involved with its teaching. Teaching Primary Physical Education provides a concise overview of the knowledge, skills and understanding required for the confident teaching of physical education in primary schools.

This book offers a balanced and comprehensive overview of the subject, covering issues such as safe practice in PE, inclusion, subject leadership and cross-curricular approaches to physical education supported by an accessible theory-informed approach.

Teaching Primary Physical Education is supported by a companion website www.sagepub.co.uk/lawrence, which includes further practical examples of applications, links to relevant literature and teaching resources, offering further student-friendly material for use across different physical disciplines.

This is essential reading for all students studying primary physical education on primary initial teacher education courses including undergraduate (BEd, BA with QTS), postgraduate (PGCE, SCITT), and employment-based routes into teaching, and also for those on Sports Studies courses with a Primary PE component.

Dr Julia Lawrence is Subject Leader of Physical Education at Leeds Metropolitan University.

578576949f671_gbooks

Learning to Teach in the Primary School

How can you become an effective primary school teacher? What do you need to be able to do? What do you need to know?

Flexible, effective and creative primary school teachers require subject knowledge, an understanding of their pupils and how they learn, a range of strategies for managing behaviour and organising environments for learning, and the ability to respond to dynamic classroom situations.

This second edition of Learning to Teach in the Primary School, fully updated since the introduction of the QTS standards, provides valuable support to trainee teachers during both the taught component and the school placement element of their initial teacher education course. It provides an accessible and engaging introduction to teaching and learning that every student teacher needs to acquire in order to gain Qualified Teacher Status, as well as the underlying theory.

Written by experts in primary school teaching, this edition is divided into 37 units each covering essential concepts and skills, including:

  • approaching planning
  • understanding early years practice NEW
  • assessment for learning
  • e-learning NEW
  • inclusive approaches
  • personalised learning and pupil voice NEW
  • research and further qualifications NEW
  • responding to ethnic diversity and gender differences
  • teaching modern foreign languages NEW
  • the professional standards of teaching
  • working with others.

Each unit offers a range of learning activities for trainee teachers in the form of tasks. Masters Level challenges – new to this edition – and annotated lists of further reading are provided for those who want to explore topics in more detail.

This comprehensive textbook is essential reading for all students training to be primary school teachers, including those on undergraduate teacher training courses (BEd, BA with QTS, BSc with QTS), postgraduate teacher training courses (PGCE, SCITT), and employment-based teacher training courses (GTP, RTP, Teach First), plus those studying Education Studies.

5785768e56b33_gbooks

Professional Studies in Primary Education

Developing an understanding of the professional aspects of teaching is an integral part of training to teach in primary education, and requires a broad and deep engagement with a wide number of practical and theoretical issues.

Professional Studies in Primary Education provides a wide-ranging overview of everything you will need to know to prepare you for your primary initial teacher education course, and your early career in the classroom.

Covering practical issues including behaviour management and classroom organisation, through to thought-provoking topics such as reflecting on your own teaching practice and developing critical thinking skills in the classroom, this textbook offers a modern and insightful exploration of the realities of teaching in primary education today. This approach is supported by:

  • An awareness of current policy developments and statutory requirements
  • Examining complex, multi-faceted issues in education
  • Exploring alternative approaches to primary teaching practice
  • Investigating ways to encourage personal and professional development as a teacher.

Additional online resources at www.uk.sagepub.com/cooper
There are also free companion resources supporting and extending chapters, including activities, case studies, further reading and useful web links.

This is essential reading for all students on primary initial teacher education courses including undergraduate (BEd, BA with QTS), postgraduate (PGCE, SCITT), and employment-based routes into teaching.

Hilary Cooper is Professor of History and Pedagogy at the University of Cumbria

5785768cc556c_gbooks

Readings for Learning to Teach in the Secondary School

Readings for Learning to Teach in the Secondary School brings together key articles to develop and support student teachers’ understanding of the theory, research and evidence base that underpins effective practice.

Designed for all students engaging with M Level study, each reading is contextualised and includes questions to encourage reflection and help you engage with material critically. Annotated further reading for every section supports your own research and writing.

Readings are structured to make links with the practical guidance in the accompanying core textbook, Learning to Teach in the Secondary School. Topics covered include:

  • motivation
  • troublesome classroom behaviour
  • ability grouping
  • inclusive education
  • personalised learning
  • testing
  • achievement and underachievement.

Edited by the team that brings us Learning to Teach in the Secondary School, this Reader is an indispensible ‘one-stop’ resource that will support all students studying, researching and writing at M level on PGCE courses, as well as those on all other secondary education courses and masters degrees.