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Reflective Teaching, Effective Learning

Whether or not instruction appears in their job titles, librarians are often in the position of educating their users, colleagues, and peers to locate and evaluate information. Because MLIS education tends to offer less-than-comprehensive preparation in pedagogy and instructional design, this much-needed book tackles the challenge of effective teaching and training head-on. Char Booth, an avid library education and technology advocate, introduces a series of concepts that will empower readers at any level of experience to become better designers and presenters, as well as building their confidence and satisfaction as library educators.

Dyslexia in the Foreign Language Classroom

This book addresses specific learning difficulties in reading and spelling – developmental dyslexia. Set in the cross-linguistic context, it presents issues surrounding dyslexia from the perspective of a foreign language teacher. It is intended to serve as a reference book for those involved in foreign language teaching, including experienced in-service teachers and novice teachers, as well as teacher trainers and trainees. It offers an up-to-date and reader-friendly study of the mechanisms of dyslexia and an overview of the current research on the disorder, in theoretical and practical terms. Its aim is to help teachers tackle one of the many challenges they face in the modern classroom: the organization of an effective foreign language teaching process for students with dyslexia.

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Critical Encounters in Secondary English

Because of the emphasis placed on nonfiction and informational texts by the Common Core State Standards, literature teachers all over the country are re-evaluating their curriculum and looking for thoughtful ways to incorporate nonfiction into their courses. They are also rethinking their pedagogy as they consider ways to approach texts that are outside the usual fare of secondary literature classrooms. The Third Edition of Critical Encounters in Secondary English provides an integrated approach to incorporating nonfiction and informational texts into the literature classroom. Grounded in solid theory with new field-tested classroom activities, this new edition shows teachers how to adapt practices that have always defined good pedagogy to the new generation of standards for literature instruction.

New for the Third Edition:

A new preface and new introduction that discusses the CCSS and their implications for literature instruction.  Lists of nonfiction texts at the end of each chapter related to the critical lens described in that chapter. A new chapter on new historicism, a critical lens uniquely suited to interpreting nonfiction and informational sources.  New classroom activities created and field-tested specifically for use with nonfiction texts. Additional activities that demonstrate how informational texts can be used in conjunction with traditional literary texts.

“What a smart and useful book!”
—Mike Rose, University of California, Los Angeles

“[This book] has enriched my understanding both of teaching literature and of how I read. I know of no other book quite like it.” 
—Michael W. Smith, Temple University, College of Education

“I have recommended Critical Encounters to every group of preservice and practicing teachers that I have taught or worked with and I will continue to do so.” 
—Ernest Morrell, director of the Institute for Urban and Minority Education (IUME), Teachers College, Columbia University

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The Power of Pictures

The Power of Pictures

In The Power of Pictures book and companion DVD, Beth Olshansky introduces teachers to her innovative art-based approach to literacy instruction. Widely practiced in classrooms across the country, the model has been proven by research to improve literacy achievement with a wide range of learners, especially those who struggle with verbal skills. At the heart of her approach is the Artists/Writers Workshop. Through study of quality picture books and hands-on art experiences, students learn to visualize, “paint pictures with words,” and ultimately create their own extraordinary artistic and literary work. The book and DVD explain how any teacher can successfully use this process to enable all students, particularly low performers, to make dramatic gains in both reading and writing.

Praise for The Power of Pictures

“Beth Olshansky provides teachers with sound, refined methods for engaging all students in integrated studies of art, writing, and literature. Unlike other literacy claims, these techniques truly leave no child behind.”
—Susan Stires, PhD, Reading and Literacy Program, Bank Street College

“This dynamic approach engages all learners while addressing the mandates of No Child Left Behind. Our Title I and special education students consistently scored above the national and state averages on standardized reading and writing assessments.”
—Dr. Susan O’Connor, director of instruction for language arts andscience, Exeter School District, New Hampshire

“I have witnessed the results of this visual approach to writing on standardized reading assessments. At the beginning of the school year, 33% of my students scored 1-4 years below grade level in reading comprehension. After 8 months of consistent use of Picturing Writing, only 3% scored below grade level with 75% scoring 1-4 years above grade level!”
—Amanda E. Urrutia-Rayburn, third-grade teacher, Manchester G.A.T.E. School, Fowler, California

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Teaching and Learning Argumentative Writing in High School English Language Arts Classrooms

Focused on the teaching and learning argumentative writing in grades 9-12, this important contribution to literacy education research and classroom practice offers a new perspective, a set of principled practices, and case studies of excellent teaching. The case studies illustrate teaching and learning argumentative writing as the construction of knowledge and new understandings about experiences, ideas, and texts. Six themes key to teaching argumentative writing as a thoughtful, multi‐leveled practice for deep learning and expression are presented: teaching and learning argumentative writing as social practice, teachers’ epistemological beliefs about argumentative writing, variations in instructional chains, instructional conversations in support of argumentative writing as deep learning and appreciation of multiple perspectives, contextualized analysis of argumentative writing, and the teaching and learning of argumentative writing and the construction of rationalities.

Teaching Adolescent Writers

In an increasingly demanding world of literacy, it has become critical that students know how to write effectively. From the requirements of standardized tests to those of the wired workplace, the ability to write well, once a luxury, has become a necessity. Many students are leaving school without the necessary writing practice and skills needed to compete in a complex and fast-moving Information Age. Unless we teach them how to run with it, they are in danger of being run over by a stampede–a literacy stampede.

In Teaching Adolescent Writers, Kelly Gallagher, author of Reading Reasons and Deeper Reading, shows how students can be taught to write effectively. Kelly shares a number of classroom-tested strategies that enable teachers to:

  • understand the importance of teaching writing;
  • motivate young writers;
  • see the importance modeling plays in building young writers (modeling from both the teacher and from real-world text);
  • understand how providing choice elevates adolescent writing (and how to allow for choice within a rigorous curriculum);
  • help students recognize the importance of purpose and audience;
  • assess essays in ways that drive better writing performance.

Infused with humor and illuminating anecdotes, Kelly draws on his classroom experiences and work as co-director of a regional writing project to offer teachers both practical ways to incorporate writing instruction into their day and compelling reasons to do so.

Teaching Literacy Through the Arts

Accessible and hands-on yet grounded in research, this book addresses the “whats,” “whys,” and “how-tos” of integrating literacy instruction and the arts in grades K-8. Even teachers without any arts background will gain the skills they need to bring music, drama, visual arts, and dance into their classrooms. Provided are a wealth of specific resources and activities that other teachers have successfully used to build students’ oral language, concepts of print, phonemic awareness, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and writing, while also promoting creativity and self-expression. Special features include reproducible worksheets and checklists for developing, evaluating, and implementing arts-related lesson plans.

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Using Apps for Learning Across the Curriculum

How can apps be used to foster learning with literacy across the curriculum? This book offers both a theoretical framework for considering app affordances and practical ways to use apps to build students’ disciplinary literacies and to foster a wide range of literacy practices.

Using Apps for Learning Across the Curriculum

  • presents a wide range of different apps and also assesses their value
  • features methods for and apps related to planning instruction and assessing student learning
  • identifies favorite apps whose affordances are most likely to foster certain disciplinary literacies
  • includes resources and apps for professional development
  • provides examples of student learning in the classroom

A website (www.usingipads.pbworks.com) with resources for teaching and further reading for each chapter, a link to a blog for continuing conversations about topics in the book (appsforlearningliteracies.com), and more enhance the usefulness of the book.

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Handbook of Research on Children’s and Young Adult Literature

This landmark volume is the first to bring together leading scholarship on children’s and young adult literature from three intersecting disciplines: Education, English, and Library and Information Science. Distinguished by its multidisciplinary approach, it describes and analyzes the different aspects of literary reading, texts, and contexts to illuminate how the book is transformed within and across different academic figurations of reading and interpreting children’s literature.

  • Part one considers perspectives on readers and reading literature in home, school, library, and community settings.
  • Part two introduces analytic frames for studying young adult novels, picturebooks, indigenous literature, graphic novels, and other genres. Chapters include commentary on literary experiences and creative production from renowned authors and illustrators.
  • Part three focuses on the social contexts of literary study, with chapters on censorship, awards, marketing, and literary museums.

The singular contribution of this Handbook is to lay the groundwork for colleagues across disciplines to redraw the map of their separately figured worlds, thus to enlarge the scope of scholarship and dialogue as well as push ahead into uncharted territory.